We talk a lot about head gaskets on this site and a variety of other things. I encourage  you to post a topic that you’d like to see covered in our discussions and I’ll see if I can shed some light on it for you.

Mike Corbin

Independent Subaru Expert

44 Comments

  1. HansD
    January 23, 2013 Reply

    2002 Impreza check engine light on, code says evap leak and catalist sys. level low. any ideas, And how do you check evap. sys for leaks. Thanks

    • Mike Corbin
      January 23, 2013 Reply

      Hello Hans,

      First it’s important to verify which code is the primary fault code. There are two different things that may be occuring. The evap system on the Impreza may have a slow leak allowing unburned fuel vapor to be released into the atmosphere. The #1 component that is responsible for this is the gas cap. Either loose or just failing internally. If that does not solve the problem then further evap testing and diagnostics will be needed. Other than visibly looking at all the evap hoses and connections a “smoke test” may need to be performed where the system is pressurized with smoke and you inspect it until you find where the smoke is escaping.

      The other code is possibly a weak catalytic converter. A reputable shop that knows how to use their scan tool to monitor the front and rear oxygen sensor can perform a simple diagnostic to see how well the catalytic converter is performing. When a catalytic converter fails on a Subaru it can be a gradual thing so don’t just jump in and buy a new one unless the code continues to recurr or the test shows it’s failing.

      Good luck on the Impreza,

      Mike Corbin
      Smart Service
      Independent Subaru Expert
      Shoreline, Washington
      206-417-0880

  2. Erin
    January 23, 2013 Reply

    I have a 2006 Tribeca B9 just had the serpentine belt and 2 of the ‘tensioner wheels’ replaced and the mechanic said looks like the head gaskets might be getting ready to be replaced but have some time. My son has a Legacy wagon that we just had the HG replaced – $1800. How much more is the Tribeca going to run?…and is it worth the repair? it has 96,000 miles on it.

    Thanks!

    Erin

    • Mike Corbin
      January 23, 2013 Reply

      Hello Erin,

      I would save up for the head gaskets on the Tribeca but it could be a long while until they are eventually needed. The Tribeca still should have a lot of life if you have kept up on the maintenance. Head gaskets do run quite a bit more since you need to take off the front end of the vehicle to remove the engine. I’d guess in the $3500 range considering the additional labor needed and the fact it’s a 6 cyl engine.

      Keep an eye on them in the meantime.

      Take care,
      Mike Corbin
      Smart Service
      Independent Subaru Expert
      Shoreline, WA
      https://www.smart-service.com

  3. Timothy LeVan
    January 23, 2013 Reply

    ’06 Outback wagon non turbo 2.5~80,000. Had HG’s replaced a 60,000. Replaced with a turbo gasket.Also timming belt,pump,pulleys,etc. Found out after the service that they used a 3M Roloc Disc to clean the surface of the heads(block?) Did I pay for an expensive pacth repair? Had no idea that Suibaru service did this to the head surface!

    • Mike Corbin
      January 23, 2013 Reply

      Hi Timothy,

      A 3m roloc discs can be used per Subaru’s head cleaning bulletin # 02-100-06R

      “3M™ Roloc™ Bristle Discs, part # 051131-07528, Size 2 inch, Grade 120, Color White”

      I don’t think you paid for an expensive patch repair. It sounds like it may have been done correctly in this case.

      Cheers,
      Mike Corbin
      Smart Service
      Independent Subaru Expert
      Seatle, WA

  4. LarryB
    January 23, 2013 Reply

    Sorry Mike, another head gasket question. I’ve just been told by my mechanic that my 2004 Subaru Legacy (2.5L) is leaking oil from both head gaskets. It is leaking oil all of a sudden, because spots have shown up on the drive. It has about 89,000 miles. I’ve had some overheating issues in the past, but I kept topping off the coolant and the problem went away. The car is in good shape overall, but one thing I worry about is the transmission (auto). It at times feels sluggish or hesitates. Is there much history with Sub autotrans failing? Other than that, I wouldn’t have a problem putting $2500 into the car if the gaskets need replacing. Great blog, and many thanks. Larry

    • Mike Corbin
      January 23, 2013 Reply

      Hi Larry,

      From my experience it is uncommon for a Subaru transmission to fail during the life of the vehicle although it sounds like you may have a different case. I would get the transmission diagnosed prior to the head gasket repair. It may be normal wear and tear but it can be costly if it’s the beginning of a bigger problem.

      Good luck,
      Mike Corbin
      Smart Service

  5. Timothy LeVan
    January 23, 2013 Reply

    Mike, First I’d like to thank you for your timely reply You’ve put my mind at ease about the head gasket prep.
    Now I can enjoy many more miles on my Subaru.

  6. Russ Oliver
    January 23, 2013 Reply

    Hi Mike,
    I have an unmolested 2005 Legacy GT Limited 5MT sedan, an an interest in both upgrading her and continuing to enjoy her company for many more years. What improvements do you and your staff recommend and had the best long term experience with? Cobb Stage 2 package for HP gain? Any brake or suspension mods that pass muster?

    • Mike Corbin
      January 23, 2013 Reply

      Hi Russ,

      I think the Cobb Stage 2 is a very good option that is simple to install as well as engineered to increase the performance while still focusing on long term reliability. Front and rear sway bars are also a nice addition. You may think about going with the Bilstein strut/spring combo used on the Spec-B for a nice upgrade. There are lots of brake options for your car depending on how much you’d like to spend and how large your wheels are. AP Racing offers some very nice options but they’re spendy. I had some on my WRX and they were amazing on the track.

      I hope this answers your questions.

      Take care,
      Mike Corbin
      Smart Service
      Shoreline Wa
      Seattle’s Independent Subaru Experts

  7. Laura Cher
    January 23, 2013 Reply

    Hi Mike,
    We are considering buying a used Forester for our college student. Can you recommend whether there are any years we should steer clear of due to engine or other common mechanical failures? We are thinking of looking for 2003-2007.

    Thanks!

    • Mike Corbin
      January 23, 2013 Reply

      Hi Laura,

      The 03-07 is certainly a good choice. You may want to stay away from the turbo version (XT) since they are more expensive to repair if something goes wrong and are more sensitive if they weren’t well maintained.

      You still may have to install new head gaskets at sometime during the live of the car but that’s usually the only large issue you’ll run into.

      Take care,
      Mike Corbin
      Smart Service
      https://www.smart-service.com

  8. Sally
    January 23, 2013 Reply

    We are looking at replacing our 1999 Ford Explorer with a Subaru, but all the talk about gaskets is a bit daunting. Can you speak to the current Subaru models and head gasket issues, or have they not changed in the last few years?

    It’s been recommended that I consider a Honda CRV instead, but we’ve really been focused on the Subaru.

    Suggestions on what we can expect with a new subaru orsites to look at.
    Thanks, Sally

    • Mike Corbin
      January 23, 2013 Reply

      Hi Sally,

      I don’t know if the newest Subarus will have the need for head gaskets in their future but one never knows. I think if you like the car and it fits your needs that’s the most important thing. If Subarus had all sorts of problems that would be one thing but the fact is the only thing if at all that’s a weak spot is the head gaskets. If you keep your cars long term it really doesn’t amount to much. Let’s say you keep the Subaru 10 years and in the 10th year some time the head gaskets were to fail, At today’s price of around $2500 to do head gaskets, the Subaru ended up costing you $250 a year more than the competitors model. The reality is that most cars need some kind of repair years down the road. A CRV or RAV4 can have their own issues.

      What ever your choice make sure it really fits your needs. All of the models above are very reliable cars long term but at some point, you need to re-invest in them if you are going to continue to get use out of them for years to come.

      Take care,
      Mike Corbin
      Smart Service
      Your Independent Subaru Expert
      206-417-0880

  9. Erica
    January 23, 2013 Reply

    Hi there! Thanks for putting together this amazing thread!

    I bought a ’98 legacy outback with 145k about two and a half years ago. It had the head gaskets, water pump, and timing belt replaced just before I bought it. It has had three water pumps fail in the time that I have owned it. Luckily they’ve been covered by warranty so it has not been too crazy expensive, just a pain having it in the shop for those long labor fixes. Can you think of anything that would cause the water pump to fail multiple times?

    Thanks again for your time,
    Erica

    • Mike Corbin
      January 23, 2013 Reply

      Hi Erica,

      For the pump to fail that frequently my first thought is that is not a very high quality pump.

      I suggest asking for a brand name of Paraut for your next water pump. It is the same manufacturer that makes them for Subaru and they are a very good quality. If you have been using this particular pump then maybe your coolant is the issue. I would recommend using genuine Subaru coolant and see if that helps.

      Take care,

      Mike Corbin
      Independent Subaru Expert
      Shoreline, WA
      206-417-0880
      https://www.smart-service.com

  10. Maria R
    January 23, 2013 Reply

    We have a 2000 forester and just replaced our head gaskets. Ouch! But I am writing about another mystery issue.
    Sometimes when we brake, especially if we brake hard, there is a clunk or thud type sound and vibration which comes from the right rear wheel area, just as the pressure on the brake pedal is relaxed, as when you are nearly stopped. The dealer has looked at this three separate times and has been unable to even reproduce the symptoms and so we are still wondering what it might be.
    Any thoughts?
    Maria

    • Mike Corbin
      January 23, 2013 Reply

      Hi Maria,

      Sometimes when the struts are getting old they can stick.

      The shock will then release at a stop and you hear it pop. I would look closely at the strut on the corner that is causing the noise. Peal back the dust cover and look for any sign of wear. There will usually be circular rings worn into the strut piston (chrome shaft) they may also have rust and scoring on them.

      I hope this helps find your problem.

      Mike Corbin
      Smart Service
      Seattle’s Independent Subaru Expert
      206-417-0880
      https://www.smart-service.com

  11. Sten Seemann
    January 23, 2013 Reply

    Mike,
    I have a 2008 Outback wagon i 5 speed. 2 years ago the manual transmission started whining. I brought it and they replaced some bearings in the transmission under warranty. I asked to see the parts and once seeing them I suspected that I may have more problems later as other parts likely were worn abnormally since the bearings failed. They told me they would cover future problems, but I did not get it in writing.
    Sure enough 2 years later the same problem again and they admitted to me it was the same problem. Now however the car is just a few thousand miles out of the 60K mile warranty. At first they wanted me to pay for all of the repair, but with some help from the Subaru USA office, they now want to charge me for $500 of the repair and Subaru USA will cover the rest. I feel I should not have to cover any of the repair cost and I should be given more than a 1 year warranty on the 2nd repair.
    The original transmission obviously was assembled improperly the first time or had a bad part.
    The second time the repair either was
    1. not done correctly- perhaps poor alignment
    2. the repair parts were defective. or
    3. They did not replace enough parts and some worn ones still existed.
    I have been told most transmission shops will not touch Subaru manual transmissions because they are so involved and tricky to get put back together right.
    I have still not authorized the repair because I am not happy with the thought of paying for a repair that will likely fail again. Subaru USA says that if the repair had been bad it would have failed right away. But we are talking about minuscule alignment issues and wear. Over time a machine that is not properly set up will wear until the wear becomes more than the machines tolerances.
    Do I need a new transmission?
    Please offer me some advice. Thank you.

    • Mike Corbin
      January 23, 2013 Reply

      Hi Sten,

      I don’t know what the skill level of your Subaru dealers staff is but if it’s questionable you may want to have it done at a different Subaru dealer. I’d still probably opt to have the dealer do it for $500 though. (although I’d still write letters etc and try to get it for free).

      My opinion is that if it is done right the first time, it could very well last the life of the vehicle.

      Good luck in your endeavor.

      Mike Corbin
      Independent Subaru Expert in Seattle

  12. Jim
    January 23, 2013 Reply

    Mike:

    Here on the East coast looking at purchasing a 2002 Outback L.L. Bean addition 3.0 H6 engine with 196,000 miles. Have read extensively about the 2.5 engine with head gasket issues. How about the 3.0 H6?

    The engine is long in the tooth but the body (six month of salted roadways in winter every year here in the East coast) is in pretty good shape. Took it for a test drive and it was pretty responsive.

    I noticed the RPM’s go past 2,000 on the tachometer when running above 55 MPH. The engine needs a nice shampoo and all the linkage need a nice soaking of PB Blaster or Liquid Wrench. The tranny fluid is a little dark but no burning smell. Could it be just sticky linkage?

    Looking to purchase the vehicle at around $3500 or lower. At 196,000 miles, am I looking at many major repairs down the road? Ideally would like to hang on to it for about 3 years and the appeal of AWD for winters and 3.0 6H engine is the appeal of this Outback.

    • Mike Corbin
      January 23, 2013 Reply

      Greetings Jim,

      The 3.0 has been quite a bit better on the head gasket front. Although at almost 200k I would be prepared to do them in the not so distant future if they are still original. By that mileage they are usually leaking oil fairly well. As long as you’re feeling it shift from 1-2-3-4 then feel a slight drop in rpm when the lockup torque converter engages then it’s probably fine. If you don’t feel that last lock up, that could explain why the rpm stays a bit higher.

      They are very enjoyable cars to drive when they’re running right. A bit more spendy to repair due to the additional cylinders but worth it in my opinion.

      Good luck
      Mike Corbin
      Smart Service
      206-417-0880
      https://www.facebook.com/subie.guys.5

  13. Nathan Zollner
    January 23, 2013 Reply

    hi mike.
    I have a 05 baja sport. I have put 118,000 miles on it and I’m the original owner. Haven’t had many problems with it until recently. I have noticed that the steering is kinda sloppy. Kinda like when you have a heavy load in back and the front tires arn’t touching like they normally do. I took it in and got new breaks, and while they had it up i looked underneath it to see if anything looked out of place. I noticed the axle boots where torn, and they suggested to replace it and the rack and pinnion. Considering they didn’t notice this problem on their own i took it somewhere else to be worked on.(i had told them about the sloppy steering and asked them to look at it). I replaced the axles and told the next place about the problem. They said it looked fine. I noticed grease above the steering assembly and wondered where it came from. They looked at it again, and figured it was either a small oil leak from the engine, or left over grease from the axles. It’s not leaking down on the ground, so I don’t think it’s engine oil. Power steering fluid is between the high and low markers. So after all of that, what can cause the sloppy steering?
    Thank you for any help you can give me!
    Nathan
    p.s. I’m in kentucky and finding a mechanic that has extensive knowledge of subaru are kinda hard to find.

    • Mike Corbin
      January 23, 2013 Reply

      Hi Nathan,

      Is the loose steering something that recently has been occuring or is this something that’s always been that way. If it is something that started to happen recently, I would inspect the tie rod ends and ball joints. There is also a preload adjustment on the power steering rack. It is possible that it needs to be adjusted. Also if the alignment is out, it can make it feel like it wants to wander a bit also.

      I hope these tips hely with your Baja.

      Take care,
      Mike Corbin
      Smart Service
      Independent Subaru in Shoreline Washington
      206-417-0880
      https://www.smart-service.com

  14. Larry Bunting
    January 23, 2013 Reply

    Hi Mike,

    My 1995 Legacy 2.2L has a leaking camshaft seal. I’m going to replace both of them. (I’ve already removed the timing belt and the cam sprockets.)

    I know that I need to stay away from the shaft and remove them from the outside edge of the seal.

    Are there any tricks to removing them and/or replacing them?

    Thanks, -Larry-

    • Mike Corbin
      January 23, 2013 Reply

      Hi Larry,
      There are seal pullers you can by that are kind of a hooked tool that can go in and hook the lip of the seal without damaging the cam or crankshafts. Just be very careful not to scratch the cam or crank when you remove the seal.

      Other than that it’s pretty simple.

      Good luck,

      Mike Corbin
      Independent Subaru Expert
      Seattle, Everett, Kirkland and vicinity
      https://www.smart-service.com

  15. Larry Bunting
    January 23, 2013 Reply

    Thanks Mike.

    What I ended up doing is drilling a small hole in the face of the old seal and srewing in a blunt-tipped screw. The screw pushed against the casing behind the seal and forced the seal out cleanly with no scratches.

    Using a Pick in the drilled hole would have worked well too.

    Thanks for your response!

    -Larry-

    • Mike Corbin
      January 23, 2013 Reply

      Nicely done.

  16. Rick Owens
    January 23, 2013 Reply

    Mike,
    My daughters’ ’02 Impreza Outback Sport started to hesitate and surge at idle and when accelerating in different speed ranges two days ago. The only re-creation I came upon was when the air-conditioning and fan was on.
    My question is.. is the air suppose to turn off when the car is accelerated? Could a malfunction here cause the stumbling experienced?
    Thanks for any input.

    • Mike Corbin
      January 23, 2013 Reply

      Hi Rick,

      The air conditioning will cycle in and out as it needs to as long as the fan is in the AC or any defrost position.

      If it only does it with the AC on I suspect it is related. The AC system will send a signal to the engine idle system to bump the idle up when the AC kicks in to compensate for the extra load. It could be completely normal or it could have an issue of over or under compensating for the system. It could also have a defective AC compressor that is putting too heavy a load on the system.

      I hope this helps you diagnose it.

      Good Luck,
      Mike Corbin
      206-417-0880
      Smart Service
      Independent Subaru Experts

  17. rdp
    January 23, 2013 Reply

    We have a 1999 Legacy wagon automatic with the 2.2 engine. We bought it from the first owner back in 2003 with about 50K on it. It has been regularly maintained since then, but recently we experienced delay in shifting into drive from reverse. Long story short, no codes, but dropping the pan showed something was starting to come apart in the transmission. This is our only vehicle at present so we probably need to get this done. Any thoughts on longevity? We now have about 165K on it. We are overdue for timing belt replacement as it was done earlier than usual in connection with some work covered under warranty.
    Thanks so much for your input. Wish we weren’t in CT!

    • Mike Corbin
      January 23, 2013 Reply

      Hi,

      It’s hard to tell how long the transmission may last with that delay but it could still go a while before failing. I wouldn’t sink too much money into it and possibly keep an eye out for a used transmission with lower mileage.

      Also, the timing belt breaking will bend the valves on that engine so I’d get that done asap.

      Take care,
      Mike Corbin
      Smart Service
      https://www.smart-service.com

  18. rdp
    January 23, 2013 Reply

    Thanks, Mike. It’s interesting you mention a used transmission.. That was our first thought but we haven’t been able to find a shop that will even consider it. They all say too many bad outcomes. We have a guy who will do a complete rebuild with a 3 yr/36,000 mile warranty for $3400. Body is in good shape and, as I say, routine service/maintenance has always been done. What would you do?
    Very grateful for your input.
    Robin

    • Mike Corbin
      January 23, 2013 Reply

      On Subarus, transmissions rarely fail so that’s why used can be an option. Sure they don’t have the same warranty and most shops will disclaim any warranty on the transmission but most of the time it still works out just fine. If you want the route with the warranty the $3400 with it’s 3/36 warranty is a good price. (read the fine print on the warranty before making the decision).

      Take care,
      Mike Corbin
      Smart Service
      Independent Subaru Expert
      206-718-9921

  19. Stephen
    January 23, 2013 Reply

    Steering Gear/Assembly:

    Yes I have a 2002 Impreza TS AWD, and currently have to buy new tires and struts at a shy amount of 160,000 miles, as well as an alignment. My first question pretaining to struts, do I need to replace the mounts as well or just the assembly? But back to the steering gear, mine had a small drip leak that did not affect the fluid levels, and is slowly getting larger, still not affecting the fluid levels. It is leaking on the drivers side. Do I need to replace this assembly now with all the other stuff so I dont chew up my new tires or can this way. Correct me if i am wrong, but I believe the steering assembly works the tie rod, which may or may not effect my alignment and wear on tires… Please help.. and also can you recommend or guide me to what kind of steering assembly to buy, new or reman and what manuf.? maybe some tire input too please. Thanks

    • Mike Corbin
      January 23, 2013 Reply

      Hi Stephen,

      Replacing the strut mounts is a plus but I would look at them before deciding on replacement. If they are cracked or sagging then replace them. If they look good, reuse them.

      As far as your steering leak, There’s really no advantage to doing it right now. Once the leak becomes either too messy or it starts affecting the level in the resevoir you can opt for either a new or reman unit. Either way they should still be able to perform the alignment with the original leaky rack.

      Good luck,

      Mike Corbin
      Smart Service
      Independent Subaru Repair in Seattle
      https://www.smart-service.com

  20. Stephen
    January 23, 2013 Reply

    And BTW, thanks for the great post, very helpful. The time you spend doing this is greatly appreciated!

  21. Stephen
    January 23, 2013 Reply

    Hi Mike, Thanks for the last insight. Just an update, had my struts and steering gear looked at and all is well, my leaks ended up being my head gaskets. In my 2.5, had the heads torn down, machined and replaced with new gaskets, new timing belt and water pump. Question, I have since put just under 500 miles on the car since the change out, should my car be leaking oil still? Well after 125 miles of the 500, my engine light came back on, had the code pulled and read 0420, took it instantly back the the mechanic who did the work to investigate the code deeper, he also concurred with what the reading was, either for the O2 sensors or Cat. Converter. He Cleared the code said drive it some more to see if it clears itself after the work that has been done, well 63.1 miles later the engine light came back on and also noticed an oil drip in my driveway. Thought well it was run off from the engine work..continued driving it for the rest of the week. The oil spot got bigger over the next few days. I got up under it over the weekend and seems to be leaking the same way as it did prior to the motor work, but actually a bit more. Should this be happening, and if the head is leaking what could be leaking now, in the same drip pattern as before the head work? Thanks

    • Mike Corbin
      January 23, 2013 Reply

      Hi Stephen.

      If you had a proper head gasket job done there should be no oil leaks from your engine. If you did the bare minimum and just did the head gaskets only, it’s possible some of the other seals or gaskets are still leaking such as a rear main seal or oil pump seal etc. Consult your receipt to see what they did.

      If the head gasket is leaking again, then I would either have them repair it again under warranty or get your money back.

      Good luck,
      Mike Corbin
      Smart Service
      https://www.smart-service.com

  22. Barb
    January 23, 2013 Reply

    Hi Mike!

    You gave me some really good advice 2 years ago on some maintenance work I had done at a dealership that went very sour! With your help I was able to get the dealership make things right. So here I am coming to you again.

    Most, if not all, of the heat shield parts are gone off my 2008 Outback. I didn’t realize this right away, at least not until I had one heck of a noise start as I was driving in late winter–like I was dragging something. Immediately stopped to look under the car, and there was a large piece of aluminum dragging with a large thin slab of ice on it. So I googled this and found that it is part of the heat shields. Looked under the car after my research to see that many pieces of the heat shield complex are gone. I read thru stuff on the Subaru forums and other sites and saw quite a few comments like “don’t worry about them, you don’t need them.” I did get a quote from the dealership of $754 which covers the whole 12 pieces, but it’s probably not accurate as there was no labor component.

    What I really want to know is do I really need to get this done? I think this happened due to “plowing” through so much snow–we had tons of it late in the season, for a week or so we were getting about a foot every day with one day getting almost 2 feet! The plowing would explain the slab of ice on top of a lower shield piece I think. I know enough not to park on long dry grass of course, this is forest fire country. So what can happen to my car without this in place? Your thoughts would be VERY appreciated! And . . . it’s not another head gasket question 🙂

    Thanks much,

    Barb P
    Western Montana

    • Mike Corbin
      January 23, 2013 Reply

      Hi Barb,

      I’ve seen plenty of Subaru’s that have lost their heat shields over the years due to road salt, corrosion etc. It may in theory do more damage to the components above it that end up getting hotter than intended but in the 28+ years of working on Subarus I haven’t actually seen it do any damage yet.

      I hope this helps in your decision.

      Mike
      Smart Service
      Independent Subaru Repair in Seattle
      https://www.smart-service.com

  23. JJ
    January 23, 2013 Reply

    I would like to recommend a blog article. I live in a local neighborhood close to Mukilteo Smart Service with hundreds of homes. What is amazing is the high percentage of Subarus in our neighborhood. A number of us have been longtime Smart Service customers and the conversations have always been very positive. Last couple of years I noticed a change and even people questioning Smart Service. One key thing that came up was the frequent recommendation for a partial CVT drain/fill… for some has been every 20k miles at $250, even with regular driving. I do understand the reason behind wanting more frequent drain/fill with the CVT challenges that have been occurring and not being able to do a complete flush, but has left feeling some feeling it is excessive, which is the reason I am reaching out to recommend it be covered in a blog article.

    I tried to resolve the uncertainty/question by reaching out to SOA and a number of dealerships. I was told by some service departments and references that SOA considers the CVT fluid a lifetime fluid, with that it should be inspected and changed out when needed. I found one dealership only recommending the inspection, and another recommending doing a 7-qt drain and fill every 100k. Reviewing a number of threads in the Subaru forums, it appears most are recommending a drain and fill every 60k. The Warranty & Maintenance Booklet that came with the car shows inspection every 30 months/37.5k miles and fluid replacement only every 24,855 miles with severe driving.

    I really thought in researching, would quickly address and confirm reasoning. Unfortunately it had the exact opposite effect and has left even more of us wondering, including myself. I am certainly not a believer any fluid is “lifetime.” The question really comes down to the interval that is being recommended. I realize just because Smart Service is doing this and others are not, doesn’t mean it isn’t the best thing to do. I am hoping it is just more of an education and understanding that will be gained through article and that this suggestion is helpful to Smart Service as well.

    • Mike Corbin
      January 23, 2013 Reply

      Thank you JJ. That is a good idea. I’ll work on getting one out there to help those that want to get the most out of their CVT, why draining/filling is a benefit for the long term reliability. I appreciate your input.

      Cheers,
      Mike

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